2014 General Conference, Update #3

GC2014

While I continue to pull together some personal reflections on the 2014 General Conference of the Brethren in Christ Church in the U.S. (as I promised here and here), I wanted to share some smart reflections from my friend, colleague, and fellow blogger Harriet Sider Bicksler.

At her blog Pieces of Peace, Harriet reflects on the recent General Conference gathering — and especially the trust (or lack thereof) displayed by both conference delegates and church leaders.

Here’s an excerpt from her excellent post, “What I’ve Been Thinking About This Summer“:

In denominational business meetings last weekend where I was a delegate from my congregation, as questions were raised about proposed changes in governance, the issue of trust took center stage. I firmly believe that our denominational leaders want what is best for the church; I also understand and sympathize with those who were questioning past actions and current proposals and displaying what appeared to be a lack of trust in their leaders.

I’ve been on both sides of this matter of organizational trust. I’ve been on boards (and chaired one of them) that made decisions that weren’t always appreciated or supported by the rank-and-file. I’ve been hurt by accusations both direct and indirect that the board didn’t know what it was doing, we had some kind of hidden agenda, we weren’t worthy of trust. The truth is that members of the boards I was on really had the best interests of the organization at heart, tried to be wise and careful in our decision-making, but among many good decisions also made some that in hindsight didn’t work out so well. Being considered untrustworthy feels like a low blow when we were doing our best to do the right thing.

On the other hand, I’ve also been the “victim” of decisions by organizations that didn’t make sense to me, seemed to head the organization in a direction that would result in a loss of things I believe(d) critical to the organization’s mission and identity, and could have unintended consequences (or perhaps intended, I would think, when I was in my most distrustful and cynical frame of mind). I’ve been frustrated by leaders, who when challenged say something like, “you chose us to be your leaders, so you need to trust us; you need to submit to our authority.” It doesn’t sit well with me when those who support organizational decisions and directions seem to want to shut down dissent and conversation and move on.

Harriet’s words reflect my own personal processing of the Conference proceedings. Read her whole blog post here.

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About Devin Manzullo-Thomas

Father to Lucas. Husband to Katie. Prof and administrator at Messiah College. PhD student at Temple University. Member of Grantham BIC.
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2 Responses to 2014 General Conference, Update #3

  1. Jonny Rashid says:

    Great comments in Harriet’s post, too.

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